The liner France, at St Nazaire 1962, and she was over 1000 feet in length. In 1979 she was converted at Bremerhaven into 

the cruise ship Norway (photo on   the next page). Broken up at Alang in 2006.

photo Patrick Depelsenaire

Guglielmo Marconi, Aden 1965. One of a pair of beautiful Italian liners on the Australian service for Lloyd Triestino. Became the cruise ship Costa Riviera and American Adventurer before being scrapped in India in 2002.

photo Don Hazeldine

 

The troopship Nevasa, leaving Singapore 1962. Owned by British India Line, she was managed by the Ministry of Transport. After trooping she became an educational cruise ship. Despite her fine exterior, junior soldiers' accommodation was in 3 tier bunks. Broken up in Taiwan in 1975

photo Don Hazeldine

Shota Rustaveli, Malta 1994. After service as a cruise liner she was scrapped in India in 2003.

photo Alec Dearness

SA Oranje, Southampton, 1974. Built as the Pretoria Castle for Union-Castle Line she sailed under South African colours in the second phase of her career. Scrapped in Taiwan in 1975.

photo Don Hazeldine

Oriana, Southampton, 1974. Launched for the Orient Line with a corn coloured hull in 1960, she became P&O's second largest ship after the Canberra. In 1986 she became a floating hotel and tourist attraction, initially in Japan then in China. She was scrapped in China after sustaining storm damage in 2004

photo Don Hazeldine

P&O's Canton leaving Singapore 1962 for the breakers in Hong Kong. She had an impressive war record, sailing 250,000 miles as an armed merchant cruiser and 21,000 miles as a troopship, carrying 6825 troops. A poignant moment as I watched her final departure, with my father. I was 8 years old and became hooked on ship histories.

photo Don Hazeldine

Fedor Shalyapin, ex-Ivernia of Cunard, Malta 1991. Built in 1955 she sailed on the Canadian service. Renamed Franconia in 1962 she was sold to Russia as a cruise ship and was scrapped in Alang, India in 2004

photo Don Hazeldine

Eugenio Costa, off Naples 1991. As the Eugenio C she was a 33,000 ton liner on the Genoa -South American service from 1966. She was renovated and renamed in 1983 and eventually became the Big Red Boat II. She was scrapped in Alang, India in 2005.

photo Admeto Verde

Caribe, Miami 1993. The Caribe was built as the Greek Line's Olympia in 1953 for the transatlantic service. She was also the cruise ship Regal Empress. She was scrapped in India in 2009.

photo JanetACook

P&O's Canberra, Aden 1965. Despite being limited by the confines of the jetty at Steamer Point and the camera lens, I was still thrilled when this photo was taken. She took part in the Falklands Campaign in 1982 and eventually went to the breakers at Gadani Beach, Pakistan in 1997

photo Don Hazeldine

Achille Lauro, Malta 1973. Built as the Dutch liner Willem Ruys in 1947 for the Far East service, she was converted into a modern looking emigrant ship to Australia in 1965. She suffered two major collisions, a hijacking in 1985 and four fires, eventually sinking in the Indian Ocean in 1994. 

photo Don Hazeldine

Cristoforo Columbus, Gibraltar 1964. Probably more famous for being the sister of the ill-fated Andrea Doria which sank in 1956. In this photo she swept into the bay, before heading out into the Atlantic. She was scrapped in Taiwan in 1983.

photo Don Hazeldine

Shanghai, ex-P&O liner Cathay,

ex-Baudouinville, Hong Kong 1994. P&O bought the ship for £3m from Belgium after Congo's independence. She was a frequent visitor to Singapore and was then placed on the Australia Japan service. Her sister the Chitral was scrapped in 1976 but the Cathay survived until 1996 with China Ocean Shipping. 

photo Derek Dodd

SA Vaal, Edinburgh Castle (1948-1976) & Canberra, Southampton late '60s. The SA Vaal was the former Union-Castle liner Transvaal Castle and went on to be the cruise ships Festivale, IslandBreeze and Big Red Boat III. She was scrapped in 2003.

photo Jonathan Waite

Nevasa, Singapore 1962. Another fine view of this vessel. Troopships had yellow funnels and a blue band on the hull. As a cruise ship with British India Line she had a black funnel with two white bands

photo Don Hazeldine

Enchanted Isle, Miami 1994. An amazing ship as she was the Argentina of 1958, the Veendam, Brasil, Monarch Star, Bermuda Star after that. Her sister, the Brasil, had 8 name changes. Both ships were scrapped 2003/04 

photo JanetACook

The Queen Elizabeth, Southampton 1967, the largest passenger ship in the world from 1938 to 1972. By my calculations, I make her the 140th largest ship including the current newbuilds. 

photo Jonathan Waite

Another view  of the majestic  Queen Elizabeth, leaving New York. She was destroyed by fire in Hong Kong in 1972 when she was the Seawise University.

photo Bill Cotter

Edinburgh Castle, Southampton, July 1967. She was built by Harland & Wolff in 1948 and was scrapped in Taiwan in 1976.  

photo Jonathan Waite

Franconia of Cunard Line, Southampton, July 1967. Launched as the Ivernia in 1954 she is pictured elsewhere on this site as the Fedor Shalyapin - but you cannot improve on that green paintwork.   

photo Jonathan Waite

Royal Mail Liner Andes, Southampton 1965. Launched in 1939 she sailed throughout the war and was finally scrapped in Belgium in 1971. 25,689 tons

photo Don Hazeldine Collection

Inbetween - the liner France being converted to the cruise ship Norway at Bremerhaven in 1979. Taken with a tiny instamatic camera, hence the quality

photo Don Hazeldine

Galileo Galilei, Aden 1965. Not as fortunate as her sister; after service as the Galileo, Meridian and SunVista, she caught fire and sank off Malaysia in 1999. 

photo Don Hazeldine

Moore-Mccormack's Argentina, Copenhagen 1960. The same ship, seen above as the Enchanted Isle.  

photo Don Hazeldine (Snr)

Caronia, Southampton, late 60s. A beautiful Cunard liner in her green cruising livery. Built in 1948, she defied the breakers by sinking at Guam in 1974. 35,400 tons.  

photo Jonathan Waite

The Australis of Chandris Line, Aden 1966. More famous as the United States transatlantic liner America built in 1939. She cheated the breakers and was wrecked at Fuerteventura 1994.  

photo Don Hazeldine 

P&O's Iberia, Aden 1966. One of series of wonderful liners on the Far East and Australian service from the late 40s to the early 70s. She was dogged by engine problems and was the first to go for demolition in 1973.  

photo Don Hazeldine 

Holland-America's Statendam at Rotterdam 1959. Launched in 1956, she sailed as the Rhapsody, Regent Star and Sea Harmony before being scrapped in India in 2004 

photo Frits J Rotgans

Olympic of Epirotiki Line in Greece 1995. Formerly the Canadian Pacific liner Empress of Britain she was also Queen Anna Maria, Carnivale, Fiesta Marina and Topaz. Scrapped in 2009.

photo Janet Davis

Gripsholm, Invergordon 1997. Built as Norwegian-America Line's Sagafjord she was the Saga Rose and was broken up in 2011.

photo Don Hazeldine

Orient Princess, Hong Kong 1995. Built as the Yaohua for China in 1966 at St Nazaire, France.

photo Derek Dodd

Shota Rustaveli, Invergordon 1999.

1968-2003, 19872 tons, 176m long x 23.6m beam, speed 20 knots, 700 passengers. Built for USSR by Mathias-Thesen Yard, Wismar. Scrapped in Alang, India 2003

photo Don Hazeldine

Kazakhstan, Scotland 1999. 1976-2003, 16631 tons, 157m long x 21.9m beam, speed 22 knots, 1,009 passengers. Built for USSR by Wärtsilä Turku. 

Scrapped Alang, India 2003.

photo Jean Hindle

Caribia, Genoa. Launched in 1928 as the Vulcania for Cosulich Soc Triestina she eventually became the Caribia at the end of her life. Scrapped in Kaohsiung, Taiwan in 1974

photographer unknown

Athena. A most amazing ship, launched as the Stockholm and will be forever associated with the collision with the Andrea Doria, renamed Volkerfreundschaft for East Germany, then Volker, Fridtjof Nansen, Surriento, Italia, Italia 1, Italia Prima, Valtur Prima, Caribe, Athena, Azores and is currently the Astoria. She has been updated several times throughout her long life.

photographer unknown

Two images provided for me by Chantiers de l'Atlantique, St Nazaire showing Madame de Gaulle launching the largest French liner, the SS France 

photo Don Hazeldine Collection

The Orient liner Orion in Lyttelton Harbour in the late 50s. One of my favourite old ships because I went around her in a motor boat as a child in Singapore, whilst being appraised of her war service. Launched in 1934, she was eventually scrapped in 1964. 

photo Michael Sutcliffe

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